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Grape harvest dates in Beaune help in our understanding of past and present climate

By 1st September 2019 September 10th, 2019 No Comments

A newly published series of dates of grape harvest covering the past 664 years is the latest evidence confirming how unusual the climate of the past 30 years has been. The record shows wine grapes in the Burgundy region of France were picked 13 days earlier on average since 1988 than they were in the previous six centuries. The result, published in the European Geosciences Union (EGU) journal Climate of the Past, points to the region’s hotter and drier climate in recent years.

The study was conducted by Thomas Labbé (Leibniz Institute for the History and Culture of Eastern Europe, University of Leipzig, Germany and Maison des Sciences de l’Homme de Dijon, University of Burgundy, Dijon, France), Christian Pfister (Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Switzerland), Stefan Brönnimann (Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research & Institute of Geography, University of Bern, Switzerland), Daniel Rousseau (Conseil Supérieur de la Météorologie, Paris, France), Jörg Franke (Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research & Institute of Geography, University of Bern, Switzerland), and Benjamin Bois (Biogéosciences & Institut Universitaire de la Vigne et du Vin, University of Burgundy, Dijon, France).

Read the research paper: Labbé, T., Pfister, C., Brönnimann, S., Rousseau, D., Franke, J., and Bois, B.: The longest homogeneous series of grape harvest dates, Beaune 1354–2018, and its significance for the understanding of past and present climateClim. Past 10.5194/cp-15-1485-2019, 2019.

Read the press release from the EGU.