lab snippets

A black hole hurling hot material into space

By 7 juin 2020 juillet 6th, 2020 No Comments

Hello LABNAUT readers,

This week we learnt that researchers are using imaging and spectroscopy techniques to probe the secrets of ancient and heritage artworks. Also in this post: how to amplify a weak signal by manipulating the nonlinear resonance in a nano-electromechanical resonator and a black hole outburst that has been caught on video.

Revealing the secrets of ancient and heritage materials

Synchrotron, electronic microscopy, multispectral imaging and dating methods are revealing the innermost secrets of artworks, including how they were made. The European Institute for the Non-Destructive Photon-Based Analysis of Ancient Materials (IPANEMA – Université Paris-Saclay, CNRS, Ministère de la Culture, UVSQ) is funding the development of advanced techniques and tools for the study of samples in 2D or 3D as well as statistical analysis of datasets. It also makes these assets available to the ancient and heritage materials community. IPANEMA believes that interdisciplinarity “enriches research projects through cross-fertilisation,” says Loïc Bertrand, the lab’s founder and coordinator of DIM MAP, a large, interdisciplinary network dedicated to the study of ancient and heritage materials.

Read more: Revealing the secrets of ancient and heritage materials

Weak signal amplified by manipulating the nonlinear resonance in a NEM resonator

A team of researchers at C2N has enhanced a weak electrical signal by more than an order of magnitude thanks to a nano-electromechanical (NEM) resonator. Their technique could be applied to a wide range of physical systems, they say.

Read more: Amplifying a weak signal by manipulating the nonlinear resonance in a nano-electromechanical resonator

Reference: Weak signal enhancement by nonlinear resonance control in a forced nano-electromechanical resonator. A. Chowdhury, M. G. Clerc, S. Barbay, I.Robert-Philip and R. Braive. Nature Communications

A black hole hurling hot material

Astronomers have caught a black hole hurling hot material into space at close to the speed of light. This flare-up was captured in a new movie from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory.

Read more: Black hole outburst caught on video

Reference: Relativistic X-ray jets from the black hole X-ray binary MAXI J1820+070. Mathilde Espinasse et al. The Astrophysical Journal Letters. Preprint at : arXiv:2004.06416 

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

“If we manage to prove that we can drive on Phobos, it would show that we can also drive on other small bodies, for example on Ceres or Vesta, the moons of Jupiter or the satellites of Saturn,” Gabriel Pont, responsable au CNES de la thématique « Exploration » du rover MMX

Which moon or satellite would you like to send a rover to? Please let us know, and send us any other feedback on this post or on our website, which is always evolving – at contact@labnaut.com

Best wishes, the LABNAUT team